What is Progressive Web APP (PWA)? and How to install TDM in your device?

What is Progressive Web APP (PWA)? and How to install TDM in your device?

A Progressive Web App is up to 4 times faster than any website (even the responsive website), ensuring the best user experience. Loading speed is a fundamental factor for the conversion of e-commerce. For every extra second it takes a website to load, hundreds of potential sales are lost.

Thanks to its PWA, Forbes magazine has managed to reduce the loading time to 2.5 seconds, instead of the 6.5 seconds that its mobile web required. Thus, impressions per visit have increased by 10%.

What is Progressive Web Applications (PWAs)?

Progressive Web Applications (PWAs) are a new generation of applications that take advantage of the main web technologies (HTML, CSS, and JavaScript) to create interfaces for Internet services. Unlike mobile or desktop applications, these PWAs can run in any standards-compliant browser, as well as other benefits such as push notifications, performance, or increased functionality depending on the capabilities of the device and hence its name. Progressive. We dedicate an approach to it.


Web applications have been struggling for deployment since browsers gained greater capabilities than displaying text and images. Initially, these web applications were clumsy and heavy and simply could not compete with the desktop, the classic ones that we have to install on our computers. The arrival of thousands of mobile apps before the explosion of the sale of smartphones offered another world of possibilities. Progressive web applications fall between the two, they behave like native webs but use web technologies.

History of Progressive Web Apps

The history of progressive web apps can be traced back to the launch of the original iPhone which revolutionized the industry in many more ways than we think. Apple did not originally have a store like the App Store and signed an agreement with external mobile developers to create apps for the iPhone. He also organized a JavaScript development contest on mobile phones and included a series of metatags in Safari to install an icon and direct access to a website on the iOS desktop, being able to display it with a personalized home screen and without the framework and own web browser controls.

Google took up the idea and supported the installation of mobile applications in Chrome from Android 4.0 as if they were native applications of the system. The integration of PWAs has ended up reaching all platforms: iOS, Android, Windows, macOS, or Linux, and Google has become one of its main supporters.

Advantages of Progressive Web Apps

Progressive web application features

Before we said that a PWA takes concepts and characteristics of the apps, which gives it some ‘superpowers’ that until now were not possible on the mobile web.

Installable

We can install the web on our smartphone, adding its icon and name on the desktop as if it were just another app. This will improve both the visibility and the immediacy of access in future visits. Besides, since it is a website, it does not need to take up space on the device itself and it will be installed almost instantly.

Updates automatically

Nor will it be necessary to be aware of future updates to download them. The PWA itself will be in charge of seeing what version you have and of automatically updating any new element or modification that may have been in the background.

Accessible offline

Thanks to the pre-caching functions of the Progressive Web App, browsing is always possible (and fast) regardless of the connection quality at the time. No more being unable to use the web when entering a tunnel or the internet crashing.

Accessible offline

Push Notifications

One of the most striking and inherited functions of the apps, the possibility of sending Push notifications to the smartphone even when they do not have the PWA open. It is a way to attract the attention of the user so that they return to browse our website.

Native

As we have already mentioned, having an icon on the desktop, loading with a splash screen, showing it in full screen and without any type of browser element … all this gives a huge app feeling, of being something developed natively for mobile.

Linkable

Another advantage over apps since, being a website, all URLs are perfectly linkable and easy to share..

As you can see, progressive web applications aim to provide users with a complete website experience with optimized features and the interface design of a native application.

How do they work?

The key to progressive web applications is the so-called service workers. It is a script (a controllable proxy that runs between the browser and the server) “separate from a web page, opening the door to functions that do not need a page or user interaction.” As such, these service workers form the basis of the PWA standard, using web caching for almost instant results.

Service workers only last as long as their action is required. In a PWA, when you click something or use a function, one of them kicks in, processing the event deciding whether the offline cache can complete the request. The idea is to have multiple offline caches for PWA to select from, providing a much wider range of offline functionality.

Also, the cache isn’t just for offline speed boosts. For example, if you run a PWA, but your connection is extremely erratic, the service workers can serve an old cache, in full operation, without interrupting the experience. There are websites, so well implemented, that they load very fast, even faster than a native app.

Browser support

Browser support

There are two requirements to use a progressive web application: a supported browser and an enabled service. Websites such as IsServicesWorrkedready allow us to verify the compatibility of browsers with PWA and others such as CanIUse, specialize in listing the implementation of this technology in each version and browser. For example, if you search for service workers in the search bar, you will find a table showing the version number that each browser implemented them with.

Service workers only last as long as their action is required. In a PWA, when you click something or use a function, one of them kicks in, processing the event deciding whether the offline cache can complete the request. The idea is to have multiple offline caches for PWA to select from, providing a much wider range of offline functionality.

Also, the cache isn’t just for offline speed boosts. For example, if you run a PWA, but your connection is extremely erratic, the service workers can serve an old cache, in full operation, without interrupting the experience. There are websites, so well implemented, that they load very fast, even faster than a native app.

Breaking down the current state of support:

  • Desktop browser (Full support): Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Edge, Safari
  • Desktop browser (partial support / outdated version): QQ, Baidu
  • Mobile browser (full support): Chrome, Firefox, Safari, UC Browser, Samsung Internet, Mint Browser, Wechat.
  • Mobile browser (partial support / outdated version): QQ, Android Browser, Opera Mobile
We confirm that all major web browsers support PWA. Edge Chromium and Safari are the most recent additions to the full list of support. In contrast, other alternatives like QQ and Baidu now use outdated versions and as such have fallen to the second level.

Differences between PWA and Native App

Differences between PWA and Native App

Although these two are very similar in some aspects, they have several significant differences, we will analyze them one by one.

Connectivity

To be able to use the PWAs it is necessary to be connected to a network, you will not be able to access the App without Internet (on some devices), on the other hand, the Native App works without an Internet connection.

Functionality

PWAs work fine on iOS , but not 100% like on Android, you can’t receive Push Notifications from the Web on iOS either, which seems a negative factor to several users.

On the other hand, native applications do have Push notifications and work well on both systems perfectly. Another aspect is that native applications have to be temporarily updated, while APWs do not.

Geolocation

Although the functionalities of PWA and Native Apps are very similar, PWAs do not have geofences and beacons. Geofences and beacons are tools used for sending location-based notifications, which is useful for various projects.

With PWAs you can send Push notifications (in the case of Android) based on specific criteria such as a user’s country or city, but you cannot send coordinates or your location at a precise moment, an option that Native Apps if they can do.

Discovery

The PWA have SEO , which is a tool that allows users and potential customers to find information about your app or business. On the other hand, Native Apps are referenced by search engines, since ASO (App Store Optimization) exists for them, but it is not as powerful as classic Web SEO.

Rules for publication

Publishing a native app means you agree to all additional guidelines, reviews, and costs. Before publishing the application, it will ask you to respect all the regulations, if they do not follow them, the application may be rejected.

On the other hand, the PWAs have a publication process without restrictions, free and without additional costs. If you are looking to have your application in the Play Store, you must follow the following rules.

In the end, none is better than another, each one has its advantages and disadvantages and is better adapted to one type of project or another, so it depends on the client.

What is a Native App?

A Native App is an application that we obtain from any mobile application digital distribution platform such as Google Play (Android) and Play Store (iOS) and is downloaded and installed on the device.

These Apps are developed and optimized specifically for an operating system so they are programmed with a specific code. Since it takes into account the possibilities offered by the hardware and the operating system, it is better suited to the design and operation for the operating system that was created.

Thanks to this, it takes advantage of all the features offered by the hardware such as the camera, GPS with less difficulty when using them.

Install The Devil Merch PWA in your device

If you are browsing the TDM from your mobile device when opening TDM most likely you will be prompted a pop-up asking if you want to add an app to the home screen.

Install The Devil Merch PWA in your device

However, if you do not see a TDM PWA install prompt Immediate, simply follow these steps to quickly install TDM Progressive Web App to your mobile device.

How to add a TDM App to the Home Screen

  1. Open thedevilmerch.com in your browser.
  2. Click on top right corner three-dot button.
  3. Scroll down and tap Add to Home screen.
  4. Confirm by tapping Add.
How to add a TDM App to the Home Screen

That’s it! You have successfully installed a TDM to your device and now can access the installed TDM app simply by tapping the icon!

Install TDM PWA on desktop

  1. Open thedevilmerch.com in your preferred browser.
  2. Click on an install button in the address bar.
  3. Click Install.
Install TDM PWA on desktop

How to find progressive web apps

PWAs are already everywhere. Many companies have adapted their websites and services to offer a version of the Progressive Web App. In many cases, you will find them directly when browsing the Internet. For example, when you visit the Twitter mobile site, an ‘Add to home screen’ dialog will be triggered. Of course, visiting countless sites and expecting to see a trigger on the screen is not helpful.

Several web portals catalog them. One of them is outweb, listing a pretty decent range of PWAs, and new options that appear frequently. Another good compilation is found in pwa.rocks, with a lower number than the previous one, but perhaps with a more useful selection.

Also, starting with Chrome 72 for Android, Google added the Trusted Web Activity (TWA) feature, which allows Chrome tabs to open in standalone mode. In turn, this allows the PWAs to appear in the Google Play app store. The first PWAs to appear on Google Play were Twitter Lite, Instagram Lite, and Google Maps Go. Many others have accumulated since then.

Will Progressive Web Apps Replace Native Web Apps? No, at least for the moment. PWAs are not yet a massively widespread standard. They are a lightweight offering and since they are currently predominantly focused on replicating existing sites and services, they cannot replace native applications.

Conclusion

However, its advantages in compatibility, performance, ease of sharing, push notifications or installation and use without downloads and without taking up space on devices, augur well for it once more websites enable them and a greater number of users use them. It is also easy to start developing them in case you dare with this Google tutorial that is a good starting point. Have you used them? What is your experience?

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